Behind the Scenes: or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House (Penguin Classics)

Behind the Scenes: Thirty Years a Slave and Four Years in the White House
Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Behind the Scenes: or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House (Penguin Classics) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Behind the Scenes: or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House (Penguin Classics) book. Happy reading Behind the Scenes: or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House (Penguin Classics) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Behind the Scenes: or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House (Penguin Classics) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Behind the Scenes: or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House (Penguin Classics) Pocket Guide.

This was not successful, and she went on to Washington D.

  • The Digital Dividend of Terrestrial Broadcasting.
  • by Keckley, Elizabeth.
  • The Complexities of Slavery in the Nation's Capital.
  • Campside Chef Outdoor Cooking Guide;
  • Navigation menu.
  • Q&A with Henry Louis Gates;
  • Check the Technique: Liner Notes for Hip-Hop Junkies.

There she met Mrs. Then she became Mrs. A dress she made for a Mrs. McClean opened an important door for her. Elizabeth made a dress for Mrs. Lincoln which pleased the First Lady so well she hired her to become her dressmaker. She made 15 or 16 dresses for her that spring and summer. One day an actress tried to bribe Elizabeth to help her get a job as a servant in the White House.

The woman wanted to spy on the Lincoln family and write gossip articles about them. Elizabeth told her, "Madam you are mistaken in regard to my character.

Sooner than betray the trust of a friend I would throw myself in the Potomac river". Elizabeth helped to care for Willie, the Lincoln's son after he became ill. The effect of Willie's death was so great, his mother was not able to attend the funeral. Elizabeth understood. She too had lost her son in the war. Lincoln confided in her. Mary once told her about debts she had incurred. The President was unaware of his wife's debts.

Behind the Scenes; or Thirty Years a Slave and Four Years in the White House

One day Elizabeth asked Mrs. Lincoln for a special favor. She asked for the right-hand glove the President would wear at his second inauguration, and Mrs. Lincoln honored her request. Within a few weeks Mrs. Lincoln moved to Chicago and insisted her friend go with her. By the laws of God and nature, as interpreted by man, one-half of my boy was free, and why should not this fair birthright of freedom remove the curse from the other half?

Behind the Scenes, or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House (Docsouth Books)

Keckley writes about a visit she made to the plantation where she had been a slave following her White House years. She borrowed the money from her patrons in St. Louis, and was able to repay it. There she found a different life, being treated with respect by merchants and establishing a dressmaking shop serving women such as the wives of Jefferson Davis and Robert E. When Abraham Lincoln became President, her skills brought her to the attention of Mrs.

Lincoln relied on her not only for her needle skills but also as a confident and friend. Many in the capital avoided Mrs. Lincoln for many reasons: She was from the West; she was opinionated ;she was jealous; she was suspicious; she was moody. Following the death of Willie Lincoln, the second of her sons to die, Mrs.

EMMA Audiobook by Jane Austen - Full Audio book with Subtitles - Part 1 of 2

Lincoln entered into a deep depression, she was adamant against allowing her older son Robert enlist in the Army. She thought she had sacrificed enough and that his services were not needed.

Penguin Clothbound Classics: The Complete List - Tale Away

Even though she had a seamstress business to run in Washington, Mrs. Keckley and the Lincoln children were her only companions. Follow The Nation. Her master offered to just let her leave, but she wanted to really be free. In this event, there may be a slight delay in shipping and possible variation in description.

Eventually he did enlist but was assigned to a less dangerous position. Their helplessness was branded idleness.

  • Anita Rao | BPR!
  • Behind the Scenes: Or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House.
  • The Complexities of Slavery in the Nation's Capital - White House Historical Association.

Freedom brought poverty. She learned to read and write, against the wishes of her masters, and her son attended college. She began an association to help poor colored people, especially soldiers. In the process, she became acquainted with people such as Frederick Douglass. When Abraham Lincoln was assassinated it got worse; Mrs.

Keckley and the Lincoln children were her only companions.

Primary Navigation

She refused to see any other callers. Even though she had a seamstress business to run in Washington, Mrs. Lincoln insisted that Mrs. Keckley accompany her to Chicago where Mrs. Lincoln continued her isolation. If a colored boy appears dull, so does a white boy sometimes; and if a whole race is judged by a single example of apparent dullness, another race should be judged by a similar example. She tried several methods to raise money and eventually moved to Chicago. Keckley also consulted with Frederick Douglass about ways to help Mrs.

Keckley was given several personal items from both President and Mrs. Many were donated to Wilberforce University, a colored college in Ohio, which had been destroyed by fire the night of the assassination. A quilt made from pieces of Mrs. I heartily recommend it. This book was an e-book.

See a Problem?

Keckley was abandoned by many white patrons, shunned by some blacks for being disloyal to President Lincoln and was no longer able to support herself as a seamstress and designer. A fascinating book written by an exceptional person, Mary Todd Lincoln's dressmaker and friend, Elizabeth Keckley.

Keckley describes many domestic scenes including the heartbreaking incidents of Willie's death and Lincoln's assassination and I feel that I have a greater understanding of both Mary's character, and the relationship between Abraham and Mary Lincoln. Keckley does not doubt that Abraham loved Mary as some have done , even though the latter was often a "difficult" person to be A fascinating book written by an exceptional person, Mary Todd Lincoln's dressmaker and friend, Elizabeth Keckley.

Keckley does not doubt that Abraham loved Mary as some have done , even though the latter was often a "difficult" person to be around. To my modern eyes, Mary was a bit stroppy and emotional, clearly opinionated and independent-minded — but she doesn't sound at all like the harpy that she has sometimes been portrayed as being. The reader is also struck by how exceptional Keckley is, and how lucky. Not only was she clearly incredibly bright, as well as a highly talented and hardworking dressmaker, she also manages to carve an incredible "rags to riches" life for herself.

Well, not quite. Although she did indeed spend the first 37 years of her life in slavery, and managed to buy herself and her son out of slavery, she was not rich when she was Mary Lincoln's dressmaker, but she was certainly comfortably middle class. Keckley was also the impetus behind, and one of the founders of, an organization that raised funds from well-to-do free blacks in order to help newly freed ex-slaves, who often arrived in the North with no money or possessions, no education or skills beyond those they had used on the plantations and cutting cane or picking cotton is not a valuable skill in New York City or Boston.

After her book was published, Keckley was publicly criticised as a traitor for "exposing" Mary, and I expect that that is in large part because "ladies" of the time were not supposed to have strong, independent opinions. So to her contemporary audience, Keckley made Mary look bad.

Although that same contemporary audience also seemed to enjoy hating Mary anyway. Keckley claims she was trying to vindicate some of Mary's decisions by explaining the motives behind them, but whether or not this was Keckley's genuine motivation it backfired. As mentioned in the Introduction to the book, "After the appearance of Behind the Scenes Mrs Lincoln contemptuously severed all ties with her former friend. I would like to know more about this episode and because the Introduction does not provide any more background on this, I give this book 4 rather than 5 stars.

more on this story

Behind the Scenes: or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House (​Penguin Classics) [Elizabeth Keckley, William L. Andrews] on snehulmalucri.gq Behind the Scenes by Elizabeth Keckley. Read an Excerpt. Buy. Read an or, Thirty Years a Slave, and Four Years in the White House. or, Thirty Years a Slave,​.

Elizabeth Keckley's story of her days as a slave, buying her freedom all the way to White House seamstress is a fascinating one. I picked this book up when I visited Mary Todd Lincoln's house in Kentucky our tour guide said it was the best one and she was right! My only complaint is that I feel that her and this is Lincoln's while there are many historical Scholars they have written amazing books about Lincoln in the White House, there's no Source better than someone who was actually there.

My only complaint is that I feel that her and this is Lincoln's final days in the White House should have ended the book, all the assassination aftermath takes place in the middle. I very much enjoyed this autobiography of Elizabeth Keckley who bought her freedom after 30 years of slavery. Then using her intelligence and seamstress skills carved out a career and the respect of many high ranking customers.

She had the unique privilege of working for Mr. Jefferson Davis and Mary Todd Lincoln. Her chapters address important parts of her life and her observations of the world around her. Possessing a lovely personality, she was able to earn the respect and confidence of two I very much enjoyed this autobiography of Elizabeth Keckley who bought her freedom after 30 years of slavery. Possessing a lovely personality, she was able to earn the respect and confidence of two first ladies Elizabeth Keckley's autobiography is my cornerstone for understanding the life of a craftswoman and entrepreneur in the critical years before and after the civil war.

Site Index

If you are interested in history from the perspective of an intelligent, articulate woman facing enormous challenges, you should read this. Her story alone is amazing. She also tells the story of Mary Todd Lincoln as a friend and confidant. Feb 16, Elaine rated it liked it. I liked reading the original source for Jennifer Chiaverini's novel, Mrs.

Positive Representation Matters

Lincoln's Dressmaker.